From Nigeria to Cleveland!

I came to Cleveland from Nigeria in August 2010 and started my higher education at Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C). My first two years in the U.S was very tough, because I schooled in the U.K for two years before I moved here so I didn’t expect to experience a lot of culture shock. The American culture is very different from that of the Nigerian culture or even that of the U.K.

My first experience with culture shock in the States was riding the RTA bus to school every morning. It was a reliable way to get from point A to point B but I had to do a lot of waiting. Before riding the RTA I had familiarize myself with the transportation system. Another difficult adjustment for me was the weather. I thought I had experienced the cold when I was in the U.K but when winter arrived it was like nothing I had ever experienced.

I missed home a lot and wanted to go back home every day, but with time I got the hang of how things worked around the City of Cleveland. After spending two years at Tri-C I transferred to Kent State University (KSU) the summer of 2013 and majored in Journalism. The atmosphere at KSU was a lot different from that of Tri-C. At KSU I had an opportunity to make friends and be a part of different organizations as well as showcase my skills as an aspiring journalist. I learned every aspect of journalism at KSU such as radio, television and newspaper which gave me a feel of the world of journalism.

The year 2016 was a great year to be in Cleveland because I participated in all of the city’s accomplishments. While I interned at WOIO Channel 19 I worked with reporters to cover the Cavaliers Championship win and the Republican National Convention. I graduated from KSU August 2016 with a Bachelor’s degree in journalism. After a months of graduation I started working with WKYC Channel 3 and I am also excited to be a part of the Global Cleveland family. Working with Global Cleveland gives me the opportunity to work with other international students like myself, by helping them adapt to the Greater Cleveland area.

Although I had a tough time adapting to Cleveland, the city has given me a great opportunity to further my career. As an international student in the field of journalism I was worried I would not find a job, but staying focused has lead me to where I am today and it is a blessing. My journey in United States is proof that no matter where you go or where you come from you can make it as long as you believe in yourself and you know what you are fighting for.


International Hiring 101: Tap into New Talent Pools

Join Global Cleveland, MidTown and Health Tech Corridor for an informational session on how to grow your business and impact your hiring goals by bringing on international talent.

Did you know?

  • International students in STEM fields can work for a period of up to 3 years after graduation under OPT (optional practical training) which does not require visa sponsorship
  • Refugees come to the US with full work authorization (no sponsorship required)

With support from local refugee resettlement agencies and experts with the Refugees Services Collaborative of Cleveland (RSC), local employers are discovering a new talent pool, finding the skilled employees they need, and experiencing increased productivity. The local economy is benefiting too, with about $50 million generated by refugee resettlement and employment.

Join us to learn how your organization can benefit from tapping into these talent pools. Speakers for this session will be Erin Brown, Immigration Attorney with and Kerissa MacKay, U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (USCRI).

Breakfast and coffee will be provided, and seating is limited - please make sure to RSVP!
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/international-hiring-101-tap-into-new-talent-pools-tickets-31073842700

Date and Time

Fri, February 10, 2017
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM EST

Location

Midtown Cleveland Inc
5000 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44103


Crossing Borders: Immigration Narratives in Cleveland (submit now!)

Literary Cleveland is currently accepting submissions of original work on the theme of immigration. Selected works will be included in an original staged reading on Sat. March 18th and Sun. March 19th as part of the Cleveland Humanities Festival. We encourage writers to interpret the theme broadly, and welcome submissions from all genres -- including (but not limited to) poetry, memoir, short story, and creative nonfiction. Submissions do not have to be written in first-person. Maximum word count for submissions should be no more than 2,500 words.

Young writers and teens are encouraged to submit, and we especially encourage entries from individuals who might not consider themselves writers but have an important story to tell. To clarify, your story does not have to include Cleveland; we are simply calling on Cleveland writers and residents to tell a story relating to the theme of immigration. Previously published work is eligible for submission too.

Submissions will be reviewed by a committee comprised of both Lit Cleveland board members and community members. Payment for accepted works consists of two free tickets to the staged performance, as well as recognition on stage and in the program.

In order to transform your written work into a dynamic performance, Lit Cleveland will engage a director to work with actors to provide a dramatic interpretation of selected works. If you are looking for ways to jumpstart your writing, Lit Cleveland will host a free workshop titled “Writing Your Family History” on Sat. Feb. 4th, from 10a-12p at Lake Erie Ink, 2843 Washington Blvd., Cleve. Hts. 44118.

The deadline for submissions is Feb. 15th. Please send submissions to [email protected] and use “Crossing Borders: Immigrant Narratives in Cleveland” as the subject header. If you have any questions, please send them to [email protected] and we will respond as quickly as possible.

“Crossing the Border: Immigrant Narratives in Cleveland” will be produced in collaboration with Cleveland State University’s College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, and will be held in the CSU Student Center ballroom. This event is co-sponsored by the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities and Cleveland State University’s College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences.